Kritsa’s Famous Church and House

After travelling overnight to arrive ‘home’ in Kritsa circa 9.30 a.m. on 5th August  it wasn’t long before an early siesta became more attractive than cleaning up the wind-blown debris that had accumulated outside.

Urgent banging woke me, and in a very disheveled state, I opened the door to Peer, a friend who lives further down Kritsotopoula Street. He’d come to tell me that the small church of Afentis Christos (featured in Kritsotopoula, Girl of Kritsa) was to  re-open that evening with a special service, and he correctly guessed that I’d be disappointed if I found out the following day.

Rodanthe's family home

Rodanthe, the heroine of my story eventually became known by the honorific title Kritsotopoula, meaning Girl of Kritsa. This was her home, and flags led the short distance from here to her father’s church, Afentis Christos.

Christos Afentis KritsaThe church has a protective coat of new plaster aimed at preserving the frescoes inside. Some parts of the church date from 13th C, like the famous Panagia Kera on the way to Kritsa.

Christos Afentis Celebration
Afentis Christos Celebration

Many of the congregation sat on a low wall around the church yard while others took along folding chairs.

Pappas addressing the congregation
Pappas addressing the congregation

In front of the external altar the aroma from baskets of rich, spicy bread mixed with heady incense.

All church photos by kind permission of Peer Moore-Friis.

Loukamathes, doughnut like cakes, dripping in honey featured among the tasty treats offered to those who’d attended the service. This photo is from Kouzina’s Kitchen, pay her a visit for many more delicious recipes.

Click photo for the recipe
Rodanthe's House in Kritsotopoula S
Rodanthe’s House in Kritsotopoula Street

The family home of Rodanthe has a distinctive cross above the door.

Nikos Massaros at the door of Kritsotopoula Museum
Nikos Massaros at the door of Kritsotopoula Museum

Here is Nikos Masseros, a descendent of Rodanthe’s family showing guests into the restored house that will soon open as a museum. People enjoyed the opportunity for an advance viewing.

Yvonne Payne inside the house of Kritsotopoula
Yvonne Payne inside the house of Kritsotopoula

I’m sitting on a sofa in the kitchen. In my story the sofa was also Rodanthe’s bed.

If you’re interested in a novel set in Kritsa visit Amazon to find out more:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Kritsotopoula-Girl-Kritsa-Yvonne-Payne-ebook/dp/B00T31U7PA

 

11 thoughts on “Kritsa’s Famous Church and House”

    1. Hi Jan, isn’t it great that we all still find hidden places in Kritsa 😃
      Walk a few yards after Rodanthe’s house to the small square (previously a children’s playground). Almost opposite is a small alley between houses and the church of Afentis Christos is just down on the right. X

      Like

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